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Posts Tagged ‘australian jazz’

Meet the Casey Golden Trio.
I’ve known all these guys for years and grew up playing music with the drummer, Rob Turner. Last night they played a smokin’ gig at 505 and I’ve uploaded two tracks that you can check out. There’ll be a debut record coming out later this year which is being recorded as I type and if you can, you should definitely give these guys a listen. A few weeks ago I spoke to Casey about doing a feature on his band and so here it is, in his own words.

When we first started playing together I wasn’t really thinking about forming a band too much. I met both Brendan and Rob on non-jazz gigs so we decided to get together and have a play on some jazz stuff one day. I remember thinking at the time how easy it was to play with these guys. It felt really good from the beginning. Around that time (mid 2008) I’d started writing a lot more than I had been before and it just seemed like a natural choice to use Brendan and Rob on some of my original tunes. We all have pretty eclectic tastes in music but there is a lot of crossover between the three of us in favourite bands/records/musicians and this is part of why I like playing with these guys. I’ll often bring tunes to rehearsal that are unfinished or vague and it never takes these guys long to come up with the sound I’m after.

From a compositional point of view, my main influence comes from a lot of the younger guys living in New York at the moment. Guys like Aaron Parks, Robert Glasper, Lage Lund, John Ellis, Gerald Clayton, the list goes on. I think all the guys mentioned above are great composers and they all have a really clear concept of how they want their bands to sound. I have a pretty clear idea of how I want the trio to sound and that sound is very much influenced by these people. Alister Spence is another important influence. I used to learn from Alister and he was one of the first people I saw who really impressed me as both a composer and player. He’s got a great trio and I think he’s very thoughtful in both composition and in his concept of the type of music his trio plays. All this being said, as far as inspiration goes, these days I seem to be inspired to compose by music other than jazz.

The hardest thing leading a group is really doing enough gigs so your band has some sort of a presence on the scene. There aren’t a huge amount of well-established places to play original jazz in Sydney so it can be difficult to get regular work. I try and continually write new stuff, so if I don’t have any trio gigs for a month or two then it’s still very much on my mind. Having a lot of new material all the time also motivates me to go out and book gigs to see what works and what doesn’t.

The main thing I’m focused on at the moment is getting everything sorted for recording our album. We’re recording in February and hope to have it out a bit later in the year. We’ve got a couple of gigs booked over the next month or two then we’ll do a bunch more when the record comes out. Buy our record.

Casey:

Favourite YouTube Video:
Best live gig seen: Aaron Goldberg Trio at the Sound Lounge, mid 2008
Seamus Blake Quintet w/ Kikoski, Lage, Matt Clohesy and Bill Stewart at Smalls, Feb 2009

Favourite album: Too hard to say, but for what I’ve been listening to over the last few months it’d be between:
Matt Penman – Catch of the Day,
Gerald Clayton – Two Shade and
David Binney and Edward Simon – Oceanos.

Rob:

Favourite YouTube Video:
Best live gig seen: Too hard to decide on one! Short List –
Ed Simon Trio (w/ John Patitucci & Brian Blade) @ The Village Vanguard, NYC
Clayton Hamilton Jazz Orchestra @ North Sea Jazz Festival, The Hague
Chris “Daddy” Dave & Friends, Revive Da Live @ Crash Mansion, NYC
Favourite Album: Oscar Peterson Trio – Night Train
(Favourite album of 2009 – Robert Glasper Trio, Double Booked)

Brendan:
Favourite YouTube Video:
Best live gig seen: The Necks at the Riverside Theatre. I couldn’t even manage to stay for the second set, it was that intense!
Favourite Album: Too many to count, but I’ll say Sam Rivers – Violet Violets

Later,
Eamon

P.S. Check out this great track from last night:

Also make sure you check out Casey’s Myspace for updates about gigs and the new album.

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Tune into ABCJazz on Digital radio on Thursday, 9pm (channel 201 on digital TV) to hear a live one hour recording of ‘The Dilworths’ recorded for ABCJazz in January 2010.

Here is the link: http://abcjazz.net.au/features/abc-jazz-recording-the-dilworths

We went in for a few hours and recorded a live set of new tunes previously unrecorded. You can also download one track – “Black and White” for free to get a taste of what to expect on Thursday.

Later

Eamon

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Last night was the album launch for the Kim Lawson Trio over at Jazzgroove. It was great to see 505 packed to hear Kim’s trio with Steve Hunter, James Hauptmann and on a couple of tunes James Ryan. I guess best term to describe the music is powerhouse jazz-rock. It’s a really great thing that these guys put out a record, as these days it seems more and more like the CD becomes your business/calling card and helps to firmly establish your band on the scene.

Check out Kimmo’s Myspace.

Later,

Eamon

P.S coming soon – Interview with Aussie saxophonist Mike Rivett who is currently studying at Manahttan School of Music plus footage of James Muller’s 4tet Live at The Basement

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Hey everyone,

Last night I got to film the great Dave Panichi’s Septet at the new 505 venue.
It was a great night featuring Phil Slater, Peter Farrar, Carl Morgan, Hugh Barrett, Brendan Clark and Evan Mannell.
Dave writes some great conceptual compositions and I hope to put up a few videos over the next week to show those who couldn’t make the gig.

For now here is Peter Farrar’s solo on the last tune for the night. Peter is one of the most interesting and exciting players in Sydney and it’s rare to see him perform. Hope you enjoy:

later,

Eamon

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1. Favourite/Most influential Jazz Musician?

It’s really difficult to put a stamp on my all time favourite musician in Jazz. I had a mantra throughout my time at the Con which was ‘DEXTRAHAR’. I still need to remind myself of what that means and how I’m representing this in my playing.

The ‘DEX’ is of course for Dexter Gordon the gentle giant. I really love the sense of humour in his playing and how he was such an influence to so many musicians but was open to what was being played by the younger guys around him.

‘TRA’ is for Coltrane and his discipline and dedication to making himself a better musician. Imagine what would have been created if he hadn’t died so young.

The ‘HAR’ is all about sound. Rory Brown introduced me to the incredible sound of Billy Harper in my first year at the Con. I still get goosebumps when I listen to ‘Preistess’. He has an enormous sound that cuts through you and then warms you up from the inside.

Seamus Blake is my modern favourite. I was fortunate to spend some time with him in New York in 2007. I really love Gary Smulyan’s baritone playing. He’s the bench mark for all modern bari players.

2. Favourite/Most Influential Australian Musician?

I know he’s from NZ but Roger Manins is my favourite Sax player. It’s a real shame that more of his music isn’t out there.

Judy Bailey was a great influence on me. She taught me to be less critical of my playing and accept that sometimes the best music happens when you are making ‘mistakes’.

3. All time favourite album?

My favourite album is ‘Standard Coltrane’ from 1958 with Red Garland, PC, Jimmy Cobb and Wilbur Haden on trumpet. There is a real looseness and a sense that it is just a bunch of guys playing over their favourite tunes and not some overly rehearsed masterpiece. When I’m at a loss I always come back to this period of Coltrane. It’s kind of like a reset button. There is a beautiful slow version of ‘Invitation’ on this record.

Other albums that I also love:

Chris Speed – Trio Iffy

Bill Frisell – Unspeakable

Anything with Seamus Blake.

Gary Smulyan – The Real Deal

4. Best live gig you’ve seen?

Kim Lawson, Danny Junor and I caught the Fung Wah bus up to Boston in 2007 to see George Garzone and the ‘Fringe’. After 5 hours of travel and the thought that we might not even make the gig, we crammed into a small room in a hostel which I think had been the scene of a horrible crime. We arrived at the gallery where the band was playing and George greeted us and suggested we visit the tavern next door for a taste of their homebrew beer the ‘Druid Fluid’.

We headed back to the gallery, took the front row seats and held on. The ‘Fringe’ is a trio with John Lockwood on Bass and Bob Gulotti on Drums that has been creating improvised music since the ‘70’s.

Garzone’s sound floored me! I had never seen anyone play so furiously yet sound so melodic and beautiful at the same time. At one climax in the music I found myself giggling uncontrollably because it made me feel so good (it might have also been the Druid Fluid).

5. What are you working on right now?

I’ve been doing most of my practise on Baritone and have been working hard to get comfortable over 3-4 octaves on both horns. I’m trying to get away from linear playing and am doing a lot of exercises on larger intervals and triad super-impositions. I am also concentrating on my posture and amount of tension in my body when I’m playing. I think it’s important to take time to go for a bike ride or a jog or anything to help with endurance. Playing a musical instrument can be pretty rough on your body!

I’m continuing to write for my Quartet with Jamie Cameron, Ben Waples and Aaron Flower.

We have a JG gig in March.

Tim Stocker
ph. 0402 043 293
timstocker
Visit Tim’s Myspace Site

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One of the things I’ve wanted to do with the blog is not only put up articles about my peers but also put up interviews with some of the people who have inspired us to make music.
I sat down with guitarist Carl Morgan a few weeks ago to come up with the following series of questions to ask Sydney based Guitarist James Muller.
Here’s what he said:

What motivates you to keep practicing/disciplining yourself to continue working on furthering your craft?

A lot of it is being inspired by other musicians, especially my contemporaries and the new-breed. I get jealous sometimes when I hear my friends sounding better than me. Ha. I don’t want to be left behind sounding old and lame! Also, I get bored playing the same old stuff.

What are some of the ways you’ve approached working on time/feel?

Mainly, it’s just something I’m always aware of rather than working on specific things. I’m more conscious of time than harmony or melody. It’s the most important component of jazz, I think. I play little rhythmic games when I practise – usually just picking a tempo and then subdividing the beat in different ways. I like going up and down through quavers, quaver triplets, semiquavers, semiquaver quintuplets and semiquaver sextuplets. Then I try and mix them all up randomly. Also, dividing regular quavers/semiquavers into odd groupings 3/5/6/7/9 etc… All of these things really help your basic 4/4 playing. Feel, is different. It’s harder to work on. I listen to players with great feels and try and analyse what it is that makes their feel great. Usually, it’s about the way they accent certain notes and where the lay on the beat, but it’s also the shape of the melodic line itself that makes it feel groovy or not. I don’t think you can play any old bunch of notes and make it swing, no matter how good your time feel is. The way the notes are arranged is really important (and the rests too!). It’s taken me a long time to figure that out…

What are some of the key aspects that you feel are most important for younger aspiring musicians to work on?

If you’re a pianist or guitarist – COMPING. I’ve only really just started to get into that. What a fool I’ve been. It’s so important to learn how to do well. Transcribe comping as well as solos…

Business skills! I’m not kidding. I still have no idea with that stuff and I really regret not learning more about it. Hopefully it’s not too late.

Are there any bands or musicians (of any genre) you’ve recently discovered that are challenging or inspiring you to think differently about music and improvisation? If so, what aspects and/or ideas have you drawn from them?

At the moment I’m on an Allan Holdsworth kick. He is a real genius. Listening to him has totally reinvigorated my practising. The way he constructs lines and chords is incredible and completely unique and I think everyone should be checking him out. He’s as heavy as Coltrane, I think. He has changed music. Sean Wayland is a constant source of inspiration. Simon Barker has some great views on music and life. I guess I haven’t “recently discovered” these guys technically speaking. All of these guys are really methodical about the way they practise and learn. I have always been really erratic and just noodled for practise which I guess works to a certain degree but it’s time for me to actually start thinking about precisely what I want.

How has living in Australia affected your development as a musician?

That’s hard. I could be nasty and say “adversely”. There is some incredible talent here and Australia it’s a wonderful place to live but I can’t help thinking we all (jazz musos) would be better off living in the US or Europe. We would be better players and might be a lot better off financially, certainly artistically. It’s not the musicians’ fault really. The more I think about it the darker I get about the way we are viewed by the general public over here. Still, there are many worse places to be.

You recently completed a tour with Sean Wayland’s band featuring Mark Guilliana. Can you tell us about your history with Sean and some of the highlights of the projects of his that you’ve been involved in?

Sean started booking me for gigs in 1997, a year or so after I moved to Sydney from Adelaide. Soon after I was in pretty well all of his subsequent groups right up until he left to live in NY. I’m not sure why he kept me on. I think initially he was impressed with my playing but later it became just as much about having a friend around that respected his music/vision. I think that’s a big part of why I played on his most recent US recordings. I think having another Aussie around experiencing these great rhythm sections and horn players is important to him. It’s great for me!! It’s been amazing to watch Sean develop so consistently over the years. He is one of the great thinkers and problem-solvers in music today, I think. As far as highlights go, the most exciting/fun gigs I did were when Sean brought out Jochen Rueckert and Matt Penman from NY in 2002. That was my first taste of a top-notch modern American rhythm section and I was in HEAVEN! I have recordings of those gigs. Really great experience. I did a couple of gigs at the 55 bar with Sean in 2007 with some great players – Will Vinson, Orlando La Fleming, Henry Cole, Rudy Royston. Matt Clohesy – they were awesome fun too. As soon as I get in the studio though, I can’t enjoy myself. Playing with Keith Carlock, Tim Lebvre and Adam Rogers on the Pistachio CD was great but I couldn’t relax. I wish we did a gig. There were Aussie highlights too – recording with Sean, Nick McBride and Brett Hirst in “the shed” – Sean’s old house in Jarrett St, Leichhardt. My amp was in Nick’s car in the driveway, turned up to 11, Brett was with the double bass in the bathroom and Nick in sean’s bedroom. The only way sean could communicate with the other guys was to speak “live” arrangement instructions into a microphone which came out on the recording! It actually sounded pretty good!!

What are you working on right now?

Chords. Trying to comp better. Trying to remove other people’s licks from my playing..it’s EMBARRASSING when I hear myself do it these days. It will stop!!

5 questions in 30 seconds

Favourite Youtube Video :
Best live gig you’ve seen: John Scofield with Larry Goldings, Dennis Irwin and Bill Stewart @ The Basement Jan 1995.
Best gig you’ve played: Hmm Sean Wayland, Matt Penman, Jochen Rueckert @ Coogee Beach Jan 2002
Current favourite album: Allan Holdsworth “The Sixteen Men Of Tain”
Where can we see you play next? Feb 6 @ the Walsh Bay Jazz Festival and Mar5/6 @ 505.

Later,
Eamon (and Carl)

P.S check out James Muller at www.jamesmuller.com

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Here’s an extract from The Dilworths performance at The Basement last December. Its my solo on Lettin Loose. Enjoy!

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Thanks to everyone who came down and supported The Dilworths set at the Jazzgroove Festival last night. Thanks to Carl Morgan or filling in – you smoked it!  It was such a great crowd and a big turn out for all the bands that night. I couldn’t stay around but heard that Elana Stone’s Band rocked the house.

For those that missed it, there was a marching band on Saturday arvo marching down Foveaux St drawing people out of the shop fronts in a wicked New Orleans style jam. It was so great and inspiring to see so many of the top sydney musicians that I’ve grown up admiring to be getting together jamming to promote the festival.

I’ll be heading down tonight to check out Gerard Masters, the Waples Brothers and the Vampires. I’m sure the Mothership will be a smokin’ gig too.

Big shout out to the Jazzgroove Association, but in particular Mat Ottignon and John Hibbard for the great efforts they went to make it such a successful festival. Hopes high that it happens again next year.

-Eamon

Current Reading: Richard Dawkins – Evidence for Evolution
Current Listening: Terence Blanchard – Choices; Check out his “webisodes’ on youtube, “Evolving” in particular episode 3 discussing the bands approach to playing.

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THIS self-titled debut album by a youthful quintet of students and ex-students from the Sydney Conservatorium is led by trumpeter Eamon Dilworth, who composed all but one of the seven tracks.

Although all members are in their 20s, they’ve had extensive local and overseas playing experience. Joining Dilworth in the front line is saxophonist Karl Laskowski, an amazing player who performed in New York’s Carnegie Hall at the age of 17.

The compositions are varied in style and reveal an exceptional level of ability, from the atonal car horn opening and eastern modality of Lettin’ Loose, to the soul-infused, relaxed Latino feel of Satura. Hugh Barrett’s piano is unobtrusively important in ensemble passages and contributes thoughtful, moving solos expertly crafted, as in Grim Hell, where he introduces Alex Boneham’s sturdily melodic acoustic bass, followed by a rapid-fire drum solo from Cameron Reid.

Laskowski by Nature is a swinging post-bop piece featuring Dilworth’s trumpet flaring brightly before the tenor sax’s galvanising lift-off in rocket trajectory. A subdued, but insistent piano riff steps through Lili Song, with the trumpet gradually developing the soothing theme, ahead of an offbeat transformation into a funky finale. The talent-packed Dilworths are a band to watch out for; their appealing compositions and articulate performances cannot be ignored.
John McBeath (Weekend Australian 2010)

For the original online article follow the link below:

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/arts/this-weeks-cds/story-e6frg8po-1225818787847

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Guitarist Carl Morgan recently moved to Sydney (across the road from me) after growing up on the south coast in Tilba, studying in Canberra for 3 years and living in Melbourne for a year.
In the last 2 months of being neighbours we’ve had many discussions about music and found we have similar views and thoughts. Carl is going to be one of the baddest guitarists in Sydney and once you’ve heard him you’ll agree. I’ve been truly inspired by his discipline and approach to improvising and in particular his exploration of poly-rhythmic ideas in improvisation.

Here’s a few questions he answered for me:

1. Favourite/Most influential Jazz Musician?

For the last 3 years New York guitarist Kurt Rosenwinkel has been undoubtably my favourite musician and the person who has had the biggest impact on my playing and conception of music. He is one of the most unique voices in jazz today and someone who has influenced many younger jazz musicians from around the world. I was initially blown away by his sense of melody on the first track, “Zhivago”, off his album “The Next Step”. He has an incredible sense of harmony, time and technique. His compositions have shaped modern jazz music. But the deep effect of his music goes beyond the notes that he plays.

2. Favourite/Most Influential Australian Musician?

James Muller is my favourite Australian jazz musician. He is an incredible guitar player as everyone who reads this I’m sure already knows. James is unique in that the stuff he can do on the guitar I’ve heard no one else do. He has an amazing feel and plays melodic and beautiful solos. Those who haven’t heard his album “Kaboom” with Matt Penman and Bill Stewart should really do so! I am also a big fan of Aussie pianists Sean Wayland and Barney McAll who are both doing great things in New York.

3. All time favourite album?

Thats a hard question, so I’ll just say a few:

D’Angelo – Voodoo

Wayne Shorter Quartet – Beyond the Sound Barrier

Kurt Rosenwinkel – The Next Step

4. Best live gig you’ve seen?

The John Scofield Trio/Wayne Shorter Quartet double bill at the Hamer Hall in Melbourne when I was in Year 12. Front row, right in front of Brian Blade! Wow!

5. What are you working on right now?

The Matt Penman workout off Dave Douglas’ Greenleaf Music blog.. Talks about practicing scales with a metronome, putting the clicks on various beats in the bar, e.g. playing a standard and putting the click on dotted crotchets. Also learning the tunes for the Dilworths gig at the Jazzgroove Festival next weekend!

Matt Penman Workout
Banff, May 2009
Metronome at 40.
Scales ascending and descending.
One note per click.
Two notes, etc…
Goes up to ten notes per click.
Metronome placement
Clicks are:
on 4.
‘And’ of 2 & 4.
‘And’ of 4.
Dotted half.
Dotted quarter.
12/8.
Different groupings of eighth notes.
Clap the polyrhythms.
Play the polyrhythms.
5/4.
Metronome on half notes.
3-2, 2-3.
Add eighth note groupings (twice as fast).
7/4.
Metronome on half notes.
Combinations of eighths against pulse.
9/8.
Metronome on dotted eighths.
Groupings.
Metronome on quarters.
Continue.

Later
Eamon

P.S Check him out on myspace

From Dan Clohesy Recording session

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