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Posts Tagged ‘The Dilworths’

Here’s an extract from The Dilworths performance at The Basement last December. Its my solo on Lettin Loose. Enjoy!

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Here is a video from my final recital last year os The Dilworths performing the Sam Rivers tune – Cyclic Episode.

James “Pug” Waples is filling in for Cameron Reid on Drums

Eamon

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THIS self-titled debut album by a youthful quintet of students and ex-students from the Sydney Conservatorium is led by trumpeter Eamon Dilworth, who composed all but one of the seven tracks.

Although all members are in their 20s, they’ve had extensive local and overseas playing experience. Joining Dilworth in the front line is saxophonist Karl Laskowski, an amazing player who performed in New York’s Carnegie Hall at the age of 17.

The compositions are varied in style and reveal an exceptional level of ability, from the atonal car horn opening and eastern modality of Lettin’ Loose, to the soul-infused, relaxed Latino feel of Satura. Hugh Barrett’s piano is unobtrusively important in ensemble passages and contributes thoughtful, moving solos expertly crafted, as in Grim Hell, where he introduces Alex Boneham’s sturdily melodic acoustic bass, followed by a rapid-fire drum solo from Cameron Reid.

Laskowski by Nature is a swinging post-bop piece featuring Dilworth’s trumpet flaring brightly before the tenor sax’s galvanising lift-off in rocket trajectory. A subdued, but insistent piano riff steps through Lili Song, with the trumpet gradually developing the soothing theme, ahead of an offbeat transformation into a funky finale. The talent-packed Dilworths are a band to watch out for; their appealing compositions and articulate performances cannot be ignored.
John McBeath (Weekend Australian 2010)

For the original online article follow the link below:

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/arts/this-weeks-cds/story-e6frg8po-1225818787847

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Just wanted to let you know that The Dilworths will be performing at the Jazzgroove futures festival on Saturday the 16th January 8pm at the Excelsior Hotel in Surry Hills.

Carl Morgan will be filling in on Guitar for Hugh Barrett whose away with The Beautiful Girls

Below is the write up from the program

8pm THE DILWORTHS

These young guys are Jazzgroove Records latest release and perhaps the next big thing. The Dilworths find the perfect balance of modern day Jazz influences, lending from American and European traditions while embracing the raw earthiness of their Australian roots. The band has undeniable experience beyond their years, having performed individually everywhere from Carnegie Hall to the Sydney Opera House.

Eamon Dilworth – Trumpet

Karl Laskowski – Tenor Saxophone

Carl Morgan – Guitar

Alex Boneham – Upright Bass

Cameron Reid – Drums

more info : www.jazzgroove.com

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Guitarist Carl Morgan recently moved to Sydney (across the road from me) after growing up on the south coast in Tilba, studying in Canberra for 3 years and living in Melbourne for a year.
In the last 2 months of being neighbours we’ve had many discussions about music and found we have similar views and thoughts. Carl is going to be one of the baddest guitarists in Sydney and once you’ve heard him you’ll agree. I’ve been truly inspired by his discipline and approach to improvising and in particular his exploration of poly-rhythmic ideas in improvisation.

Here’s a few questions he answered for me:

1. Favourite/Most influential Jazz Musician?

For the last 3 years New York guitarist Kurt Rosenwinkel has been undoubtably my favourite musician and the person who has had the biggest impact on my playing and conception of music. He is one of the most unique voices in jazz today and someone who has influenced many younger jazz musicians from around the world. I was initially blown away by his sense of melody on the first track, “Zhivago”, off his album “The Next Step”. He has an incredible sense of harmony, time and technique. His compositions have shaped modern jazz music. But the deep effect of his music goes beyond the notes that he plays.

2. Favourite/Most Influential Australian Musician?

James Muller is my favourite Australian jazz musician. He is an incredible guitar player as everyone who reads this I’m sure already knows. James is unique in that the stuff he can do on the guitar I’ve heard no one else do. He has an amazing feel and plays melodic and beautiful solos. Those who haven’t heard his album “Kaboom” with Matt Penman and Bill Stewart should really do so! I am also a big fan of Aussie pianists Sean Wayland and Barney McAll who are both doing great things in New York.

3. All time favourite album?

Thats a hard question, so I’ll just say a few:

D’Angelo – Voodoo

Wayne Shorter Quartet – Beyond the Sound Barrier

Kurt Rosenwinkel – The Next Step

4. Best live gig you’ve seen?

The John Scofield Trio/Wayne Shorter Quartet double bill at the Hamer Hall in Melbourne when I was in Year 12. Front row, right in front of Brian Blade! Wow!

5. What are you working on right now?

The Matt Penman workout off Dave Douglas’ Greenleaf Music blog.. Talks about practicing scales with a metronome, putting the clicks on various beats in the bar, e.g. playing a standard and putting the click on dotted crotchets. Also learning the tunes for the Dilworths gig at the Jazzgroove Festival next weekend!

Matt Penman Workout
Banff, May 2009
Metronome at 40.
Scales ascending and descending.
One note per click.
Two notes, etc…
Goes up to ten notes per click.
Metronome placement
Clicks are:
on 4.
‘And’ of 2 & 4.
‘And’ of 4.
Dotted half.
Dotted quarter.
12/8.
Different groupings of eighth notes.
Clap the polyrhythms.
Play the polyrhythms.
5/4.
Metronome on half notes.
3-2, 2-3.
Add eighth note groupings (twice as fast).
7/4.
Metronome on half notes.
Combinations of eighths against pulse.
9/8.
Metronome on dotted eighths.
Groupings.
Metronome on quarters.
Continue.

Later
Eamon

P.S Check him out on myspace

From Dan Clohesy Recording session

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I’ve been fortunate to grow up playing with Alex for over 10 years now, playing many of our first gigs together and making our first trips to New York and Europe together.

Once while discussing approaches and concepts to playing he said that his approach was less as a soloist and more as a supportive role to make the rest of the band feel and sound better. That’s exactly what Alex brings to the band stand, great sound, great feel and a great vibe.

Here’s his top 5 musicians on the Double Bass:

Ray Brown

Paul Chambers

Charlie Haden

Larry Grenadier

Kees Boersma

I think that is ‘the list’ at this point in my life. The first three represent my first major influences on the bass and as musicians, a list which is probably very similar to most modern jazz bassists. The remaining two are bassists who are very much alive and whom have explicitly shaped the way I think, feel and approach music and the bass. The first thing I think of when I see this list is SOUND!

Alex. (Jan 2010)

Later,

Eamon

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On behalf of The Dilworths Happy New Year and thanks to everyone who has come to our gigs and supported us over the last two years.

Thanks also to everyone who came down to our album launch at The Basement in December, it was a huge success and so much fun to play to such a warm attentive crowd. Everyone in the band came off the staging totally vibing.

You can still purchase our album from the discography page and get free postage.

If you missed the band at The Basement there are loads of other shows happening in 2010 so keep checking the gig page to find out when we are playing.

The pictures from the album launch were from Mark Matthews and he generously donated these pictures to document the great night.

In the near future The Dilworths will be posting more material for download, including recordings from the night at The Basement as well as video interviews with local Sydney musicians, the first being an interview with pianist Judy Bailey.

Thats all for now, happy new year again from all the band.

-Eamon

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